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Steam server caching issue exposes user’s account details

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Right on December 25th the popular computer gaming platform Steam has been struck by a server issue that led to the exposure of user’s account details to potentially anyone. People who had visited any Steam-affiliated link such as the Steam Store or the Community could find themselves viewing it as seen by someone else’s account.

Users weren’t actually logged in as others and no login password could have been stolen in the process. The cache server is one that’s between the user and the actual server hosted by Steam. They hold a copy of a webpage for the intended user and keep it stored there for quick loading; it only gets reloaded if in the meantime the page has changed. In this case the server would mix them up and deliver someone else’s cached page (including the account details one) to a stranger instead of their own. Read More…

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An ill-starred Retina MacBook Pro’s amazing odyssey (and why Apple’s amazing as well)

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Some time ago I talked about an ill-starred Retina MacBook Pro 15″, year 2012. Faulty computers happen, but this particular one was really unlucky to say the least. Quick recap: repaired a grand total of four times in 2015 alone, two times the upper clamshell and the logic board each.

We left ourselves with the logic board finally getting replaced; unfortunately video issues struck again. Weird artifacts were displayed when waking up the computer and once it even had a kernel panic. For me it was yet another visit to the Apple Store where, kindly, they agreed to replace the logic board again (and that was for the fourth intervention). It lasted for four days and then the issue returned. I wasn’t really excited to return to the Apple Store once more: of course it’s a great place, but in these circumstances I was sort of staggered. Read More…

How to have an actual chance of getting your MacBook back if you lose it

One of the handiest features of iCloud is Find my iPhone; if you lose track of it you can easily see its position on a map if its connected to the Internet. Chances are that you left the cellular connection on, so as long as there is signal and turned on you can see where it is. Lock it, emit a sound and remotely erase its data.

While it works for basically every Apple device configured with iCloud, retrieve a lost MacBook is trickier. You can only connect it through WiFi, and if its password locked there is no way someone can connect it to the web.  One can try through LAN cable, but since 2012 Retina MacBook Pro no Apple laptop ever had a LAN port anymore. Additionally there’s no way to identify the owner, and everybody is pretty much free to factory restore it.

What we’re going to do here isn’t anything that has to do with black magic or adding a GPS module inside it to track the Mac even in Siberia or other remote lands: we’re adding a way to let somebody know whose Mac it is if retrieved without the need of unlocking it. Read More…

Microsoft’s new Surface Book and 13″ Retina MacBook Pro: two faces of the same medal

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Something that Apple does great is designing software and hardware to work together. It’s a well known fact that finds proof every now and then like in the iPhone 6s that, although it has less powerful hardware on paper compared to other recent smartphone, it delivers much sleeker performance.

The MacBook Pro lineup received a dramatic update back in 2012 with the 15″ Retina MacBook Pro: soon after the 13″ model was fitted with a Retina display, becoming one of the most notorious Macs around. Notebooks of the same class actually had to compete with a formidable opponent. These notebooks had the disadvantage of running all the same OS and none of them was truly optimized like the MacBook.

Credits due where they’re due, Microsoft made quite an impressive job in releasing their first ever notebook that ships with their newest operative system Windows 10, and it seems to give a run for the money to the 13″ MacBook Pro. Read More…

iPhone 6S and 6S Plus #chipgate is this year’s hoax, just like the precedent…

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It has become a trend; while Apple announces record sales for the new iPhones, there has to be somebody who’s ready to point the finger at everything that might not be working properly. The iPhone 6 bendgate has been demonstrated to be an overly exaggerated reaction to somebody who liked to try bending their device, which is definitely not a smart thing to do. For those who complained about the iPhone bending in their pockets, consider you are on the Internet: you do not know what the user had done with the phone itself. There are many who simply seek a short burst of popularity, and most of the Web surfers are easy to take sides. Read More…

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